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military leaders talked about alternative energy production and the country's dependence on oil. speakers included gene sperling, director of the white house international council, and republican senators. hosted by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the
mornings to talk about the wind energy industry and the importance of the trucks tax credit. but before -- and the importance of the production tax credit. before i begin i'd like to associate myself with the majority leader's remarks. we do need to extend the tax cuts for the middle class as soon as possible. that's clearly the message the american people sent on november 6 in the nationwide election that we had. i also want to respond to the comments and the conversation between the two leaders over the debt ceiling limit. it's important to recognize that when we raise the debt ceiling all we are doing is keeping faith with what congress has already appropriated, what congress has already made clear we will spend on behalf of our country and all the various ways that the federal government operates. we cannot afford to have a situation like we had august before last where we dallied and we literally shot our economy and ourselves in the foot by not extending the debt ceiling. we saw one of the rating agencies lower our national rating; first time in history. there is a way to do this
-legalization and pro-nuclear energy. hear why. >>> we'll introduce you to an ethiopian artist fusing the music of his country with a new music of his country with a new sound. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better th
institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated it would cost 700,000. >> i choose to honor both, both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way to the pacific and of a little girl who died as a result of an atomic bombing. it is unimaginable but that must of been like --
on the united states because we still get a large part of our energy from the region. i traveled to azerbaijan an armenian in early september. and i also stopped in georgia and met with the president. when i talked to these leaders, iran was one of the things that came up at the very beginning, because they'll feel the influence and the aggressive attitude underneath cover so to speak of iran. in particular, i think azerbaijan feels a great deal of concern, and when i talked to the president, members of parliament and others, it was readily apparent to me that they thought that there ought to be closer ties between azerbaijan and the united states, and georgia, and hopefully armenia. because iran is really trying to destabilize or undermine those governments are we believe that is their long-term goal. iran has been involved in terrorism as we know for some time. it's partly unique in that area. we have seen the i-beam regime operating through organizations such as republican guard and employ such tactics around the globe including right here in washington, d.c. however, the proximity of the s
this happen more often? joining me now is tyson slocum, director of public citizen's energy program. we have david kroetzr researcher in economic and climate change from the heritage foundation. welcome to both of you. what do you think about this. >> i think we definitely have a problem with a lack of adequate federal oversight of pipeline safety. we've got over half a million miles of transmission pipelines crisscrossing across the united states and only about 110 federal inspectors. we had a pipeline safety bill that passed congress and was signed into law by obama in 2011 but it didn't go nearly far enough in beefing up finances to hire more inspectors. to mandate the increased placement of shut-off valves that in case of an incident in a pipeline you could limit the damage. melissa: yeah. >> and also i think we have to reassess the focus over the last decade of looking at terrorism security and look more at maintenance and operations particularly --. melissa: that is interesting point. let me talk to you about the details of this one. it took place just before 1:00 p.m. >> sure. melissa
to you. [ applause ] >> stephanie: do not have the -- either the energy or the know-how to get into the big box. he clearly had a lot more to say to me. >> he didn't give you a reason why he wanted to get your -- >> stephanie: my nasty [ bleep ] off the air. >> he just ordered you to. >> stephanie: he said he hopes that i do. >> oh. >> stephanie: i hate to disappoint him. i have no plans unless he knows something i don't know. hmm, speaking of wow. speaking of nasty caroline says steph, i can't believe the 38 republican senators who voted against the united nations treaty to protect the rights of the disabled. this is like a christmas carol. there's poor bob dole off his deathbed in a wheelchair -- >> he's been ill yeah. >> stephanie: last week he was reported to be not doing well. >> slapping him on the back. no, we aren't going to vote for it. it is crazy. >> stephanie: a christmas carol. they're so mean. i hope they say hello to the dodo birds. >> they're pushing bob dole over a cliff in his wheelcha
. unifying solutions. of my health is the senators willne devote much more of their energies to governance. in a perfect world we would not only govern, we would execute a coherent strategy. that is a very high bar for a in legislative branch to clear. wih we must aspire to it and pside cooperation with the president because we are facing fundamental changes in the world that will deeply affect american security and standard of livingt the lists of such changes as o long, but its starts in asia ina with the rise of china and india economic, political, and military powers. the obama administration has pot conspicuously an ounce to pet it to asia. at the center of this bid is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s.lowrave interest and a fellow traveler,n sharing mutual goals andthe vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disceri , sometimes issue by issue whether china is an adversary or partner. i this calibration will impact a d america's relations with the rest of asia, and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in th
encouraging clean energy if we will solve it. the very first place to start is to stop giving these subsidies. it is a no-brainer. the vast majority of americans of all parties actually support this perspective. melissa: without affordable energy we have no economy and that is for sure bad for my children. we have no jobs. we have no industry. >> why is the fastest growing new source of energy in this country wind energy or distributed solar. melissa: because it is completely supported by the government and by my tax dollars. >> not even close to as much as --. melissa: absolutely no money to spend on these things you know what -- >> actually big oil, gas and coal are actually much more heavily subsidized. melissa: you and disagree what is subsidy is. that is fine for debate for another time. we agree to disagree. do you know crayons, made from petroleum. >> right. maybe that is essential use in your view. we don't need to drive our cars with petroleum. we can use --. melissa: we do, because i don't want to pay $59 a gallon for biofuel. >> we need to use government and our taxpayer dollars wi
, on health care, on energy. that doesn't mean that we need to become scandinavian. we are more free wheeling, more willing to take risks. but how do these companies in scandinavia make investments in health care. that's after all what helps people succeed no matter where they come from or how poor they are. the truth is, scandinavian countries are fulfilling a huge part of the american dream better than america these stays. now thankfully, we are still an innovation power house and we need to spend more on research and development rather than cutting those budgets. and perhaps we need to target some of our innovative thinking towards restoring the american dream of equal opportunity. that would be a truly american solution to an american problem. we'll be right back. up next, a perfect example of american innovation, have we found a cure to cancer? yo, give it up, dude! up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based
energy is leaving some folks a little blue. those stories and breaking news all "happening now." the whole region on high alert as north korea moves ahead with plans to launch the long range rocket despite technical trouble we are hearing about. welcome to "happening now," i'm jenna. jon: i'm jon scott. the secretive nation announced a delay. the last attempt in april ended in failure. the united nations band north korea from conducting any missile tests several years ago after it tested nuclear weapons. the west considers the upcoming launch test for north korea to try to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of deliver a warhead. pwaeufdavid piper is streaming live from thailand. >> reporter: north korea wants to get this off without a hitch because the last one failed in april. a spokesman for north korea said there were technical problems with the module of the rocket but didn't elaborate. he said they were extending the launch period from now until december 29th. he added they were going ahead with final preparations for the launch despite those problems. s
laws. >> the former head of the international energy agency says he's willing for a dialogue with president morsi, provided that the government -- your government cancels the amendments to the current constitution, granting president morsi extensive powers and postpones the referendum on the proposed new constitution. that referendum is supposed to take place december 15th. will you meet those conditions? >> well, the question is, will we accept -- the answer is yes. morsi has started a national dialogue before three or four weeks ago, and today he announced for another invitation -- conditions is imposing the will -- >> these conditions that mohammed has put forward are unacceptable? >> everything could be discussed on the table, but not conditions. >> he says -- what about, are you open at least to postponing the referendum on the c constituti constitution? moving from december 15th? >> if we are returning back to the will of the people. why should we be -- we can change the constitution, if there is the will of the people to change it. and today it was announced that if th
if your cell phone or other tech devices need recharging, new technology makes you the energy generator. cnn's gary tuchman explains in this week's "start small, think big." >> my name is aaron lemieux. i'm founder and ceo of tremont electric and the inven earth of the n power peg >> reporter: designed for hikers, bikers or anyone on the go. >> as you walk along it harvests and stores your human kinetic energy and recharges your mobile electronic devices from the energy that it harvests from you. >> peg stands for personal energy generator. >> demonstrate it simply by standing here and walking in place. >> reporter: aaron lemieux dreamed up the ideas as an engineering student in 1996. ten years later he quit his day job and started making the peg. >> he definitely started small. one person with his wife's blessing working alone in the basement full time. >> reporter: for every minute of motion lemieux says the n power peg can juice you will a small mp 3 player and more hungry devices like smartphones take 15 minutes of walking to get you one minute of talking. >> this is where we were a
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and ship building and shipping and the ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran and that regime is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trades and commodities used in these key sectors and used to stop iran from receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency then to buy gold and we have to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past. i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much support that we were able to deploy those. but let me add that there is another portion of the amendment here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses. and i think one of the areas where we've been short, for those of you who have talked to to those in the prison there and experienced the torture, who have seen the murd
the middle of march. dennis: thank you. sandra smith is back with us. sandra: the big news is the energy information administration says they're expected rise in 2012 crude output would be the largest rice in output. since 1859, guys. this is what is attributing to this. yearyear-to-date period of over0 per barrel earlier in the year until now. all that is private business. this is how they explain the massive jump in output in the united states. resulting largely from a significant increase in onshore oil production particularly from shale and other formations. this is adding to the bigger output. right around $85 per barrel, prices had been coming down on an intraday basis. the reaction in the market, lots of volatility. we sold off hard on the news that is a very bearish for energy prices. we will see how things turn out, but it is a very bearish sign for the energy market. back to you. cheryl: thank you very much. house speaker ohn boehner saying the president has to get serious about the fiscal cliff talks. dennis: rich edson with the latest from there. >> as we have been reporting
to inject some energy at the right place at the right time. so next up here will be senator sam nunn, longstanding chairman in senate armed services, who understands our country and our national security as well or better than anyone i have ever worked with. senator none -- senator nunn? [applause] >> well, first, thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else that pete and michael and the peterson foundation have done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for a rational and sane fiscal policy. second, admiral mullen, thank you for your tremendous leadership both in the military and as a citizen in the recent months. you have led the way, and your statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to national security is our debt and our unsustainable fiscal policy is one that i totally endorse and agree with, and i commend you for making it, because your impact is very powerful. so that's my, really my first point. my second point is that even if we avoid the short-term debt crisis, the so-called cliff
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and shipbuilding and shipping and ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran, of that regime, is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder
on energy and manufacturing and research, deeply about whether he will help nih push us to the next frontiers of alzheimer's and other important biomedical research," and then say, "it is not really my business, i am not a budget%, to worry about whether we are pending on our discretionary budget." what i have to say to folks is that you cannot pretend you care deeply about innovation and research and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, i
. officials say there several kids got stick after drinking anti-energy drink. they call it marley's mellow mood. a reference to the late reggae icon, of course, the label claims it uses all natural ingredients to help people chill until the next episode. instead, kids at the school say it created a panic. >> some people like spit up and threw up. >> very drowsy and lethargic. >> everyone was going crazy about the new drink and how it's like this drink is great and everyone was buying it. >> bill: and then they wanted doritos the drink's label cautions it is not for kids. now parents are asking why the school sold it to students as young as 11. school officials have now removed said drink. they blame the company that provides the food to the cafeteria. which blames marley. prince william left london hospital where his pregnant wife is now recovering from an apparent case much severe mourning sickness. the royal palace is several hours at kate's bedside today. the palace reports she is still getting treatment but is feeling better which explains his smiles. and the head of the future royal b
to inject some energy in the right place at the right time. next appear will be senator sam nunn, longstanding german and senate armed services who understands our country and national security as well or better than anybody that i have ever worked with. thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else and for michael and the peterson foundation have done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for the rational and moral mullen thank you for the tremendous leadership and for the citizens and the recent months you have led the statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to national security is our debt and unsustainable fiscal policy is one that i totally endorse and agree with and i commend you for making it because your impact is very powerful so that is my first point. my second point is that even if we avoid the short term debt crisis, the so-called cliff, and i hope that we will, the interest on debt in the years to come will increasingly dominate the budget and pressure defense in a very ser
at a cost? there is much to admire about scandinavia. on ed kalgts, on health care, on energy, but that doesn't mean we need to become scandinavian. we are more individualual lis tick, free-wheeling, ready to take risks. americans don't need to stop being american, but why not look at how these countries in scandinavia make investments in health care, early education, and all of these things create greater opportunity. that's what, after all, helping people succeed no matter where they come from or how poor they are. the truth is scandinavian countries are fulfilling a huge part of the dream better than america these days. thankfully we're still an innovation powerhouse and we spent to spend more on research and development rather than cutting the budgets and perhaps we need to target some of our innovative thinking toward restoring the american dream of equal opportunity. that would be a truly american solution to an american problem. we'll be right back. up next, a perfect example of american innovation. have we found a cure to cancer? presenting androgel 1.62%. both are use
, but as 2012 dawns, our group green climate fund remains empty. the international energy agency tells us we have five years until the widow to avoid irreversible climate change closes. the science tells us we have five years maximum. you are seeing -- saying, give us 10. the most stark a trailer your generation's responsibility to ours is that you call this ambition. where is the courage in these rooms? now is not the time for incremental actions. in the long run, these will be seen as the defining moments of an era in which narrow self interests prevailed over science, reason, and compassion. there is real ambition in this room, but it is being dismissed as a radical, deemed not politically possible. stand with africa. long-term thinking is not radical. what is radical is to completely alter the planet's climate to betray the future of my generation and to condemn millions to death by climate change. what is radical is to write off the fact that change is within our reach. 2011 was the year in which the sun and jordy found their voice, the year when the bottom shook the top. 2011 was the y
and china. we need energy, but we need to move onto clean energy. that is one of the president's priorities. he can create a whole new infrastructure that replaces the military industrial that eisenhower warned us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow do
that is we subicized cheap to commina. this is a green energy company and part of president obama's energy policy that failed. >> gretchen: sorry to throw you because we didn't talk about it. did you see by 2030 that america will not be the super power that it has been. >> i have seen it before. the economic super power. we are spending so much more than we are taking in and borrowing the deficit largely from china. they recycle the money and buy our assets cheap. are we happy about this absolutely not. the ball is in president obama's court. are you going to do this or not. >> gretchen: it is explained simply. you are the star of your own show. >> this is very unpopular. america on a fire sale bought cheap people are not happy about it. >> gretchen: you will talk about it 9:20 a.m. on fox business network. >> thank you. >> gretchen: tax hikes and trying to avoid paying their open taxes. tucker carlson on the double standard. did you see dogs learning how to drive? did they pass the test. the results are in. i think they park better than i do for sure. ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of
at the hotel that you have question marks about the energy security story in the states. >> you know, that's right. i think we are seeing supplies go up. north america, united states, canada, mexico, they've seen significant growth in oil supplies. this year one of the few areas, next year, for a few years to come. is it something that it creates supplies to flood the world's market? no. it's going to create supplies that the world market needs. if you think about the low level of automotive transportation, penetration and emerging markets, again, this longer term story, you'll add more oil coming out of the u.s. you get more demand coming. we're going to need every barrel. >> reporter: where is the price going in 2013? >> i think we'll be higher for brent, quite a bit higher for wti. and that's because we're going to see the narrowing of that brent/wti spread as the seaway pipeline comes on line. and those barrels start flowing at a cushion to the gulf. >> reporter: one last question. the fiscal cliff, we talk about it, historical, dollar down, commodities up. i see less bang for the buck
... that would hurt all of us. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. >>> we now know the names of the two people killed at an oregon mall shooting. investigators are calling heinous. 54-year-old cindy ann yuille is described as everybody's friend who put everybody first. steven matthew forsyth is being remembered as a passionate and zest for life. kristina shevchenko remains hospitalized in serious condition. dan, what do we know about the gunman? >> reporter: wolf, we can tell you that the shooter stole the gun that was used during the attack, according to authorities, stole the gun just the day before it happened. came here to the mall, police side fied the shooter as 22-year-old jacob tyler roberts of portland
, it is your work on sanctions especially energy sanctions, that, i think has been critical and, i want to say congratulations. i saw, i saw director woolsey when i came in and i so much appreciate the briefing we have received from him and the ability to get the type of analysis also from cliff and mark and the whole fdd team. it's so helpful. if you were to ask me what is going to be the focal point of, what's the main concern we have, i think it has been and is going to continue to be iran for the foreign affairs committee and i think the administration frankly has, has lagged far behind the house. we've been far ahead in pressuring iran and a lot of that is because of your help. i think we have been united in the house in our effort to do that. i think that congressional pressure frankly is building, building quickly, in light of recent events and i'm looking forward of course to the conference report that we're going to see now from the national defense authorization act where we're going to have another chance to tighten thes into and i want -- the noose, i want to say that the ndaa amen
are the primary source of food and economic assistance, energy assistance to north korea. but then, again, the chinese had a high-level visit to north korea the day before that they announced that they were going to do this missile launch. so, even the chinese, i think, are quite frustrated. but at the same time, i would imagine that they're also not willing to completely abandon the north koreans, because they don't want to see instability in the north, which would then suggest instability along their border. and that is something they don't want to see. so china is really the country that has the most influence, and yet it's very difficult to move them to a place where the united states, japan, south korea, the other members of the six-party talks would like china to go, which is to put more pressure on the north, such that they stop these sorts of provocations and stop their missile and nuclear programs. >> all right, victor cha and spyder marks, thank you to you both for your perspective on this tonight. do appreciate it. >>> "outfront" next, with just 20 days until the fiscal cliff,
. this energy boom that we've got, the natural gas, the amount of fracturing that we're doing, the fact that housing has been doing tremendously well, and interest rates remain very low with prices, so there's some sense that there's a bit of a renaissance on the horizon, and if the government doesn't mess that up too much, 2013 could end up being as good as 2012 if not a little better. i don't know if you completely disagree with that, peter, but i think there's enough good going on that it could offset the bad. >> to you think it could go up to 10% unemployment. do you agree with peter on that? >> i don't know. i don't know if it will go go up to 10%. there are two scenarios. one is if we really go fully off the cliff, nobody does anything, and nobody fixes anything, i don't think that will ultimately happen. i think we're going to go sort of partially off this cliff, and there will be some cuts, and there will be some tax increases. probably the net result is that it will soften whatever was happening in the economy, but there are other forces that are strengthening it. i don't know
of capability, maybe in the long term that provides access to and declare weapons. so we see nuclear energy, for example, power plants that going to come to the region relatively soon if the arab springs does not interfere with those plans. the idea, the projections that are on the books come to be realized. what the motivations might be, many factors. first, it's very difficult for nuclear-weapons. you run into all the kinds of problems therein, now confronting both technical and political because we would certainly pushed back on any of the state's bill we are seeking to acquire nuclear arms. moreover, many of these states are very dependent on us, even saudi arabia is dependent on us to protect the right now and to provide advanced military equipment. that relationship is completely endangered if there seemed to be moving down the wrong track. at the same is true for egypt. maybe algeria, whatever other states you might want to identify. turkey is a nato ally and already under nuclear umbrella. in force that relationship by providing patriot missiles. so just give you the briefest overvi
in energy and commerce. thank you for your service and friendship. it is hard to go through this list. mr. miller, this is a wonderful privilege to say thank you, the countless hours that you could add up for the service to constituents and the tremendous leadership within this body and these members who have given their all and will not be back at the 113th. it's important to say their names and to honor them and give them credit for what they have done. joe baca has been a fixture for the central valley and agriculture, someone who has agriculture number one in my district as well. but there is much to remember joe baca for and his contributions in agriculture and the financial services committee as well. my colleague, former colleague, bob filner, who has already assumed another position within our government, as mayor of san diego. i think of bob filner and i think of veterans' issues and he was a college professor before he came to congress, as my husband was and reached out to each other in that capacity. he has worked hard on veterans' issues. i have 50,000 veterans in my district.
: over 60 flavors of soda, energy drinks brands that you know and love country time. >> crystal light? >> stephanie: yes. >> get out. >> stephanie: it makes cans only about $0.25 a can -- >> your abducted handyman would stay around -- >> stephanie: exactly. we would work for soda stream soda. at bed bath and beyond macy's kohl's visit soda to find the location nearest you. >> stephanie: we'll be right back on the "stephanie miller show." >> come on, it's brilliant! >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] safe driving bonus check? what is that? so weird, right? my agent, tom, said... [ voice of dennis ] ...only allstate sends you a bonus check for every six months you're accident-free... ...but i'm a woman. maybe it's a misprint. does it look like a misprint? ok. what i was trying... [ voice of dennis ] silence. ♪ ♪ ask an allstate agent about
this coalition -- those who are not here today have brought here together to try to inject some energy at the right place at the right time. next up here will be senator sam nunn, a longstanding chairman at -- of senate armed services, who understands our national security as well or better than anyone i have ever worked with. [applause] >> first, thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else. and what the peterson foundation has done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for a rational and sane and fiscal policy. second, admiral mullen, thank you for your tremendous leadership, both in military and as a citizen in recent months. you have led the way in your statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to national security is our debt and our unsustainable fiscal policy is one that i totally endorse and agree with. i commend you for making it. your impact is very powerful. that is really my first point. my second point is that even if we avoid the short-term debt crisis, the so-called cliff, and i
for fiscal responsibility and also been terrific with the state's energy industry, agriculture sector and even tourism. like many of his nebraska constituents, ben's an avid hunter and fisher and outdoorsman. but, mr. president, just as a sideline, one of the things we learn as little kids and as we get older it's something we also must adhere to, and that's not be envious. envy isn't something that is becoming of a human being, especially an adult. but i think if the truth were known, many, many senators would be very envious, as i am, and i would even think the presiding officer, about that hair of ben nelson's. i mean that is a mop of real hair. it's often that people call his office, e-mail his office, they believe he has a toupee. it's his hair. he'll pull it for you any time just to show it that it's real. he has hair like a 15-year-old, mr. president. and so, i have to acknowledge i am a little envious of his hair. and i think it's the truth for now. my wife has said on many occasions she really likes -- tells me all the time how handsome pat leahy is and so glad he doesn't do
and number four. energy was three. six, seven and eight was all about taxes, and the loss of capital, the growth of business, and tax code complexity. i mean, those are -- those are important issues for the small businesses out there. no question about it. like to know something about what's going on. >> okay. so we go -- let's say that this is resolved, that what we have facing us, some way or another, do you expect that it will come off of these lows that you're seeing? >> well, i think that we'll have to see how the economy evolves. since 80% of the declines in the index was about expectations for business conditions, and poor expectations for real growth, and your sales, that means that the small businesses are going to sit tight. they don't expect more customers so they're not going to hire, and that, of course, showed up. all the other components of the index stayed at recession levels. here we are at this very, very low level of optimism, consumer optimism tanked along with the owner optimism. and a lot of them are going to be affected. i mean, the president said only 3% of sm
if it wanted to. it supplies 90% of the north korea's energy and substantial amounts of food to keep the north korean population there instead in china. but china has not been willing to do that because it fears that the regime would collapse and the peninsula would reunify. that's what we need to convince china long term it is in their interests. if north korea's nuclear weapons program goes on other countries in the region, japan, south korea, taiwan and others are themselves going to look whether they want nuclear weapons which would obviously make the entire region much more unstable. jon: and for those who wondered whether kim jong-un had staying power as leader of north korea, he just bought himself a whole lot of time in that job, didn't he? >> well i think he showed that the capability of the north koreans has been underestimated and i think you're right. this will be a political boost for him but let's be clear. this rocket-testing program and the work with iran have been going on for decades and they have had some notable failures but each failure tells them something and each succes
a cute, younger guy. cramer becomes addicted to 5-hour energy and george's parents get skype. in another tweet, get this, jerry breaks up with a beautiful woman because she favorites every one of his tweets and cramer and newman start a podcast. >> so easy to assemble a monkey could do it. check this out. a monkey in a coat was spotted roaming around an ikea in toronto. a bunch of tweets went out, one asking, anyone lose their monkey? the answer, yes, the owner was apparently shopping inside the store and the monkey managed to get out of his crate and out of the car. animal control captured darwin, the 7-month-old primate. since monkeys are banned as pets there, guess what, he loses his monkey. >> it would be malpractice with us not to share it. >>> the late-night talk show hosts got caught up in this monkey business as well. take a look. >> this is true. a tiny monkey wearing a winter coat was found wandering around an ikea. do we have a photo of the monkey? look at that, that's real. a monkey wearing a coat. >> that's a sheerling coat. >> that monkey still has a better chance of assemb
in question, the credibility for opec is on the line. matt smith is commodities analyst at summit energy services. thanks for joining us. dive into the issue of leadership first. he has been the secretary-general for about six years. now he is stepping down. how important is who replaces him? >> well, it's very important really. he has taken us through a very torrid time in the crude market and now, at a time when they're having this meeting when you would expect there would be all these different debates going on regarding supply, regarding price, the whole cartel is happy with supply and price. yet there is the huge concern with the leadership whether it will go to an iranian a iraqi or a saudi. this is a huge concern especially at a period when we're entering where we will need cuts probably next year by opec. melissa: yeah. i mean there's a lot of focus on this. at the same time anytime i've been at a meeting most of the meeting happens away from the meeting. they all meet late into the night at each other's hotels trying to hash out what's going to be said. does saudi arabia in your
. >> stephanie: it's not even worth my energy to explain. >> how do you tax christmas? >> stephanie: you don't, and that's why -- you don't. you don't. [ sighs ] >> stephanie: like that added anything to the show. >> you want an angel on the top of the tree it is going to cost you. obama is going to charge you a million dollars. >> stephanie: all right. forty-six minutes after the hour. right back own the "stephanie miller show." >> on the stephanie miller radio show in suburban america this morning -- >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? (vo) when the clock runs out when the last card is played i want the people who watch our show, to be able to come away armed with the facts, and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them, you're put on this planet for something more. i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action themselves. as a human being tha
the tax code, change this, a tax on gas to help the energy industry, all this stuff has receded into the mist and all we're trying to do is get a deal and be done with this. it is sad. in the beginning of a second term, you should be trying to do big things. >> politics often gets in the way. these guys agree behind closed doors what should be done but nobody wants to step out on the ledge and say it publicly. >> right. you have a polarized congress. at this point, both sides think the other side is not on the level and they're interested in taking the partisan political position than accomplishing a bipartisan result. the good thing is high skilled immigrants. hard not to find someone on both sides that don't think you should allow folks that have expertise in science and technology into the country. instead of doing it, both sides use it as a lever in the immigration debate and keeps getting spooled up inside that debate and nothing gets done. >> haven't the republicans been passing it through the house and democrats won't take it up in the senate. >> they have passed it throu
. partisan as you get. on energy issues, even immigration you have more regional difference ares. these are basically republicans and democrats going at it across the board on labor issues. rick: these laws, bob, they don't ban unions. they give people the choice whether this he want to join and pay dues or not. >> republicans say, why should a republican union member contribute to a union that will then turn around that money and elect a democrat? they say that's unfair. but, unions say, listen, if you go back a century when there were very little union presence, or no union presence the working conditions were all of full. rick: we've seen this now happen in wisconsin, in ohio. we're watching it play out now on the streets in lansing, michigan. nationally speaking, what does this mean for the president who won a second term in no small part because of the support, the financial backing of the unions? >> rick, i think it is fascinating that obama has injected himself in this battle. by and large he kept the wisconsin battle before the election really at arm's length. it frustrat
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